Historic Timeline Details

The complete add, given as follows, makes no mention of his school:

To be sold at public Vendue, on Wednesday the 17th Day of June next, by the Revd. Samuel Kennedy, of Bernard’s-Town, in the County of Somerset, and Province of New-Jersey; his Plantation on which he now lives, containing 300 Acres of Land, more or less, well watered and timbered, bounded on one Side by Dead-River, & on the other by the River Passaic, having the public Road that leads to the City of Perth-Amboy going through it; it is 20 Miles from said City, 8 from Bound-Brook, 5 from New-Brunswick, 3 from Lord Sterling’s Buildings, not quite four along a public Road to Baskinridge Meeting-House, and about 1 Miles and a half of Mr. Solomon Boyle’s Mill, on which Plantation there is a Dwelling-House with three Rooms and two fireplaces on the lower floor, situate at a small Distance from the Brink of said Passaic-River, and a good Quarry for building may be opened at the Distance of a few Poles from said House: There is also on the said Plantation, a good Barn, and a Stable at each End of it, and an Orchard containing 57 old Apple Trees, and 136 young Ones, some of which are grafted; there is about 72 Acres of plough Land cleared, 12 and half of which have been mowed for a considerable Number of Years, and about 2 Acres of it has been mowed for two Years past, and about 11 Acres sowed with Timothy Seed, together with one and half Acre more, are expected to be mowed this Summer, 100 Acres more of good Meadow may be made on a very rich Bottom, being the Plantation whereon Mr. Moses Doty formerly lived. On said Day Samuel Kennedy proposes to sell Horses, Cattle, Sheep, and Utensils of Husbandry, &c &c. when good Attendance will be given, and the Conditions of Sale made known

It is possible that the western portion of the house, with its three first-floor rooms and two fireplaces, may comprise the original Kennedy dwelling.

1767-78 Col. Ephraim Martin (1733-1806) presumably acquires the Kennedy plantation sometime during this period, although no deed of conveyance to him as been found; perhaps the deed was never recorded.

Ephraim, son of Ephraim and Keziah Runyon Martin, was born in 1733, either in Piscataway, Middlesex County or in Somerset County. He presumably was living in Sussex County by 1760; genealogical sources recounting that his son Ephraim was born there in September of that year [Jay W. Thornal, “Colonel Ephraim Martin (1733-1806) His Wife or Wives,” Genealogical Magazine of New Jersey, Vol. 58, pp. 16-18].

1775 Ephraim Martin serves as one of five deputies from Sussex County attending the Provincial Congress of New Jersey held in Trenton in October [Minutes of the Provincial Congress and the Council of Safety of the State of New Jersey, 1879, page 197].

1776 Advertisement, dated May 1776, describes property for sale in Hardiston Township, Sussex County as “about one mile from the Sharpsborough iron works, and the same distance from Col. Ephraim Martin’s” [The Pennsylvania Journal, June 19, 1776, as quoted in New Jersey Archives, 2nd Series, I, Newspaper Extracts, I, page 552].

Ephraim Martin is commissioned as a colonel of the Second Regiment, Sussex County Militia on June 14th and appointed as colonel of the new fourth New Jersey Battalion the Continental Army on November 28th [Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army During the War of the Revolution, 1914, revised 1932, reprinted 1973, page 381; William S. Stryker, Official Register of the Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Revolutionary War…, 1911, reprinted 1967, pages 26, 27 & 37]. Check sources.

1776-78 Martin presumably moves from Sussex County to Bernards Township, Somerset County, sometime between June 1776, when he receives his Sussex County militia commission and May 1778, when he appears on the Bernards Township tax role, the earliest surviving for that municipality (see 1776 and 1778 entries].

1778 Ephraim Martin is assessed for 340 acres of improved land valued at 1,870 pounds, 4 horses, 17 cattle, 7 hogs, 1 slave and 1 riding chair [NJ Archives, Bernards Township Ratables, May, 1778].

1777 “Ephraim Martin, Col. 4th Jersey Regt.” advertises the desertion of a soldier from his “quarters at Princeton” on November 20th [New Jersey Gazette, December 2, 1778, as quoted in New Jersey Archives, 2nd Series, II, Newspaper Extracts, II, 1903, page 573].

1778 Ephraim Martin, colonel of the 4th New Jersey in Brigadier General William Maxwell’s Brigade; brigade included among troops wintering at Valley Forge [Fred Anderson Berg, Encyclopedia of Continental Army Units, 1972, page 148].

1779 Robert Erskine’s map of the “Road towards Morristown past Baskinridge [sic] Meeting House…” depicts a house on the subject property as that of “Col. Martins” [Erskine Map “No 70. C,” the “Road towards Morristown past Baskinridge [sic] Meeting House…, 1779].

Col, Martin resigns his army commission and is chosen in the general election held on October 12th to represent Somerset County on the New Jersey governor’s council, the upper house of the new state legislature [newspaper?, as quoted in New Jersey Archives, 2nd Series, III, Newspaper Extracts, III, 1914, page 701].

1780 Erskine maps numbers 106A and 106B depict a house on the subject property as that of “Col. Martins” [S. DeWitt, Contractions in the Jerseys 1 mile to the inch, Erskine Map 106A and 106B…, 1780].

1780 “Mrs. (Col.) Martin” is one of five Somerset County ladies listed in a notice dated July 4th as chosen to coordinate local participation in a state-wide effort of patriotic women to promote “a subscription for the relief and encouragement of those brave Men in the Continental Army” [New Jersey Gazette, July 5, 1780, as quoted in New Jersey Archives, 2nd Series, IV, Newspaper Extracts, IV, 1914, page 486].

1781 Ephraim Martin is chosen in the general election held on October 9th to represent Somerset County on the New Jersey governor’s council, the upper house of the new state legislature [New Jersey Gazette, October 17, 1781, as quoted in New Jersey Archives, 2nd Series, V, Newspaper Extracts, V, 1917, page 310].

1783 Col. Martin is appointed by state legislative act (passed on June 16th) as one of the commissioners for draining the “drowned lands” along the Wallkill in Sussex County [Public notice place by Ephraim Martin, Esq., Political Intelligencer, February 2, 1784, as quoted in Thomas Wilson, Notices From New Jersey Newspapers 1781-1790, 1988, page 186].

1784 Col. Ephraim Martin is assessed for 375 acres of improved land “value $15 [per 100?] acre[s],” 2 horses and 8 cattle [NJ Archives, Bernards Township Ratables, August 1784].

1786 Col. Ephraim Martin is appointed by Congress as surveyor under director of Thomas Hutchins, Esq., to survey the Western Territory of the United States [New York Gazetteer, June 30, 1786, as quoted in Thomas Wilson, Notices From New Jersey Newspapers 1781-1790, 1988, page 465].

1788 Col. Ephraim Martin is assessed for 264 acres of land “value $15 per 100 [acres],” 3 horses, 17 cattle and a riding chair [NJ Archives, Bernards Township Ratables, August 1788].

1789 Col. Ephraim Martin is assessed for 264 acres of land “value $15 [per 100 acres],” 4 horses, 10 cattle, 1 sleigh and 1 riding chair [NJ Archives, Bernards Township Ratables, August 1789].

Ephraim Martin of Bernards Township, advertises a reward for a mare strayed or stolen [New Jersey Journal, September 9, 1789, as quoted in Wilson, 1988, page 276].

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